Daniel L. Kaufman

Daniel L Kaufman

Professor, Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California Los Angeles

310-206-3350

Dept. Molecular & Medical Pharmacology, Center for Health Science room 23-167
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Office Address:
23-167 Center for Health Science
Dept. of Molecular & Medical Pharmacology
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
90095-1735
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Office Phone Number:
310-794-9664

Immunotherapeutics for disease Research in our lab is focused on 1) understanding the basis for immune-mediated disorders and 2) developing new therapeutics in preclinical models to help alleviate these disorders. A diagnostic test and two therapeutics for type 1 diabetes that our lab helped to develop are now in clinical use or are being tested in clinical trials. Second, we have demonstrated that immune cells express receptors for the neurotransmitter GABA and that the activation of these receptors can safely inhibit their inflammatory activities. Based on their anti-inflammatory actions, we have shown that the administration of GABA receptor agonists can inhibit or reverse type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis in mouse models. Most recently, we have pivoted our work to study whether GABA treatment could be repurposed to help treat the excessive immune responses that cause severe illness in COVID-19 patients. We have shown that GABA treatment very effectively prevents severe disease and death in two different mouse models of COVID-19. Our future research will continue to develop ways to help modulate inflammatory immune responses in human diseases.

Affiliations

Member, Brain Research InstituteImmunity, Microbes & Molecular Pathogenesis GPB Home AreaMolecular Pharmacology GPB Home AreaNeuroscience GPB Home Area

Research Interests

Research in our lab is focused on 1) understanding the basis for immune-mediated disorders and 2) developing new therapeutics in preclinical models to help alleviate these disorders. A diagnostic test and two therapeutics for type 1 diabetes that our lab helped to develop are now in clinical use or are being tested in clinical trials. Second, we have demonstrated that immune cells express receptors for the neurotransmitter GABA and that the activation of these receptors can safely inhibit their inflammatory activities. Based on their anti-inflammatory actions, we have shown that the administration of GABA receptor agonists can inhibit or reverse type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis in mouse models. Most recently, we have pivoted our work to study whether GABA treatment could be repurposed to help treat the excessive immune responses that cause severe illness in COVID-19 patients. We have shown that GABA treatment very effectively prevents severe disease and death in a mouse model of COVID-19. Our future research will continue to develop ways to help modulate dysregulated immune responses in human diseases.

 

Publications